Capstone Conference Day 2: photos & tweets

Our scholars presented their findings at our “capstone” conference October 13-14, 2017 at the University of Chicago, which we captured in photos and tweets. Visit our Flickr page for the full album and our Twitter page for more observations. Below are highlights from Saturday, October 14. Saturday, October 14 – Ida Noyes Hall, Cloister Club 9:00-10:00 am Owen Flanagan, James … Continue reading Capstone Conference Day 2: photos & tweets

Capstone Conference Schedule

If you can’t make it in person, or weren’t able to register in time, follow along as we live-tweet #VHML17 our Capstone Conference from the University of Chicago https://twitter.com/UChiVirtue  Capstone Conference University of Chicago | October 13-14, 2017 Our “capstone” conference will feature talks, panels, and discussions with the philosophers, religious thinkers, and psychologists who have … Continue reading Capstone Conference Schedule

October 13-14, 2017 | Virtue, Happiness, & the Meaning of Life Capstone Conference

Join us for our “capstone” conference, which will feature talks, panels, and discussions with the philosophers, religious thinkers, and psychologists who have been working together to investigate whether self-transcendence helps to make ordinary cultivation and exercise of virtue a source of deep happiness and meaning in human life. The conference is free and open to … Continue reading October 13-14, 2017 | Virtue, Happiness, & the Meaning of Life Capstone Conference

The Structural Significance of Pagan Virtue

We’re presenting a short series of abstracts of the work-in-progress our scholars presented and discussed at their June 2017 Working Group Meeting. Angela Knobel is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the School of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America.   Augustine is supposed to have said that the virtues of the pagans were no … Continue reading The Structural Significance of Pagan Virtue

Scrooge and Sudden Moral Change

Neo-Aristotelian virtue ethicists, unlike Aristotle himself, seem willing to agree that significant moral change – a change wherein, for instance, a vicious individual becomes virtuous or vice versa – is possible.[1] They unanimously insist, however, that if and when such a change occurs, it can only occur over a prolonged period of time. A single … Continue reading Scrooge and Sudden Moral Change